Who Will Win?

Member of Parliament, Kingston and the Islands, 2011 Federal ElectionToday is your last opportunity to beat long lines and take advantage of advance polling.  But if you’re like me, and you haven’t totally made up your mind, rest assured that all of the local candidates and federal party leaders will be pulling out all the stops over the next week to convince you that they’re the right choice come election day, May 2nd. While the big three political parties have been lobbing televised and online insults back and forth for well over a month, I’ve come to realize that nothing says “don’t vote for me” quite like an attack ad. We, as Canadians are better than that, or so I would like to believe.  I want an inspirational candidate who can sell me on their vision for the nation, rather than someone whose commercials are punctuated with tombstones and the ominous “dun-dun-dun” sound.   The big day is almost here, and accordingly this week’s poll asks the question that voters in Kingston and the Islands are facing:

Who will be Kingston's next Member of Parliament?

  • Ted Hsu (Liberal) (45%, 174 Votes)
  • Daniel Beals (NDP) (45%, 172 Votes)
  • Alicia Gordon (Conservative) (8%, 29 Votes)
  • Eric Walton (Green) (2%, 8 Votes)

Total Voters: 383

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Before the election was officially called, we asked which party our readers would support, while the NDP received a majority of the votes.  But are these results truly indicative of Kingston’s future, or simply a reflection of Kingstonist’s audience or perhaps the strength of the NDPs online campaign? While your vote in this week’s updated poll may mirror how you intend to vote on May 2nd, I suspect a few people will lock in contradictory predictions as well.


Is Kingston’s race really too close to call?  Will Liberal, NDP and Green candidates split the vote giving more power to the Conservative candidate? Going back to what I said above, my mind isn’t totally made up yet.  I am weighing two candidates, and I’m stuck on determining if I should vote for the best chance at thwarting the Conservatives, or the best match with my personal values and beliefs. In the coming days we’ll be sharing some interviews with select local candidates, which will help undecided voters make that all important decision. Are you having just as much trouble as me, or have you already made up your mind? Please drop off your comments and predictions below.


Thanks to KClevy for today’s photo.

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Harvey Kirkpatrick

Harvey Kirkpatrick is Kingstonist's Co-Founder. His features curiously explore urban planning, what if scenarios, the local food scene and notable Kingstonians. Loves playing tourist and listening to rap music. Learn more about Harvey...

12 thoughts on “Who Will Win?

  • April 25, 2011 at 12:05 pm
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    Sidebar. One guy I work with has NEVER voted. In his late 20s and believes since he doesn’t pay attention at all to politics that him voting would be a waste. So he’s uniformed, but he knows that he is. He’s better than many politicians who pretend the opposite. :) Even had people knocking at his door and just told them ‘i don’t vote’.

    I’ve said for years the leaders ‘all suck in different ways’. However I drag myself to vote. [Drag is the best word to describe it now] Probably out of habit.

    Just in the post you described a big problem. Voting locally, or voting federally. Do you vote for the federal leaders or the best person in your riding? Remember living in New Brunswick when the PCs were wiped out across the country except 2 people including Elsie Wayne in Saint John. Former Mayor everyone liked her and she was running as an MP for the Conservatives. Voters good feeling for her overtook the anger against the PCs, which was saying something if you remember that time. LOL.

    I also ended up in the riding where an idiot won. I think I can say that word once you read about this person. A term I don’t throw around loosely. Pembroke area was upset about a few things in 2000 so elected the only Alliance MP in the province. So they wanted to thwart the Liberals after electing them for 20 years in a row. They got stuck with this person (Rick Mercer’s thoughts).

    Luckily I don’t think anyone in the Kingston election can get to Cheryl’s level. That would almost be impossible. For those who didn’t know about her, well sorry to start off your Monday by giving you a headache.

    • April 26, 2011 at 10:25 am
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      The only way to get great federal representation is by voting for great local candidates. From that pool of great candidates, great leaders are chosen. This is the true difference between Kingston's 4 candidates. We have 2 who would do ok sitting in the House of Commons, 1 who needs duct tape so she'll stop embarrassing women, and Ted Hsu who has the potential to do great things for our country. Ted has the potential to be more than a vote in the House of Commons, he has the potential to make real change within the Liberal party, and perhaps eventually lead the party. The other 3 are lacking that potential. Leaders come and go, Peter Milliken survived 5 party leaders and 3 Prime Ministers. What we need to do is make sure every district is represented by smart, capable people, regardless of party alliances, so when it comes time to choose leaders, there only only good choices to pick from.

  • April 25, 2011 at 1:32 pm
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    Regardless of who was going to win I'd think Kingston would be a lot better off if we stopped being a sure thing for one party every time. Unfortunately it would appear the margin is going to be back to significantly larger then last time.

    But overall on election night there are going to be a lot of people wondering what the opposition parties could possible have been thinking in causing an election.

    • April 25, 2011 at 6:23 pm
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      The opposition parties did not cause this election. The House of Commons did its duty, our democratic process worked as it is supposed to. This isn't a case of parties deciding to force an election, this was democracy serving the populace. The opposition parties had many opportunities in the past to topple the government for various issues but they didn't. This was the first time a government has been found in contempt of Parliament and that is why there is an election, due to the ruling party overstepping its powers not simply because the opposition parties wanted an election.

  • April 26, 2011 at 11:25 am
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    A lot has changed since the pre-election poll was taken.
    The biggest thing was the fear that a vote for the NDP would help Alicia Gordon win. One thing has become abundantly clear to me. Alicia Gordon is not in any position to win this riding. That leaves me, and many of us with a choice for Ted, Eric or Daniel.
    Personally, I'm tired of people trying to gain my vote with fear. I see it on my Facebook wall, I see it in ads, I see it everywhere.
    Conservatives: Fear criminals and the economy.
    Liberals: Fear the Conservatives
    Bloc: Fear Canada
    I'm tired of fear and I think Canadians are getting tired of fear. I hope Kingstonians are included in that.
    As far as leaders, Harper never had a chance at my vote. Shooting myself in the foot would do me more good than a Conservative majority. Ignatieff lost my vote many times over with his attack ads and his fear tactics. The Greens and the NDP are the only ones who seem to be focused on positive messages and what they want to do, rather than fearing the others.
    BUT in Kingston I intend to vote for a candidate, but the candidate I choose; Ted or Daniel to be specific. Fear wont be a factor for me. In the end, I want a vote I can be proud of in the end, no matter what happens. I would feel an immense amount of guilt at the polls for voting strategically, and the rest of you should too if you are considering it. Talking about coalitions being against Canadian values; strategic voting is more so.

    Maybe a vote for the NDP will help the Conservatives. But as Eric Walton pointed out, a vote for the Liberals in Kingston could actually help the Conservatives more. So fear, fear, fear. Screw fear. I'll make up my own mind and I have enough faith to trust my fellow constituents will make the right choices. Either NDP or Liberal….but I KNOW Alicia will lose.

  • April 26, 2011 at 4:19 pm
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    I think that Daniel has been working the hardest of all the candidates. I read in the whig this morning that he has hit approx. 20,000 doors so far. He's been to my door and I like that. Seems like a real straight shooter.

  • April 26, 2011 at 7:25 pm
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    Harper will lose in Kingston & the Islands because of his high handed treatment of people who wanted him to study corrections and what makes criminals in the first place and it isn't the fear of being super-jailed, I assure you.

  • April 27, 2011 at 5:15 am
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    Haven't had anyone come to my door so far. Quite strange. Have had people before. Now automated calls have come through which are quite annoying.

  • April 27, 2011 at 10:04 am
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    I much prefer the 20 second call to having someone at my door. How many of you got the town hall call on Monday? Did you stay on the line? II thought it was pretty fascinating and a really great idea.

  • April 27, 2011 at 2:24 pm
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    Apparently 6100 people stayed on the line for Ted Hsu's virtual town hall on Monday!

  • April 27, 2011 at 6:48 pm
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    Vote for the person you truly believe will make the best member of parliament. We have to get past this party system somehow, and it starts with the voter.

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