fbpx

KFL&A Public Health releases details on 17 latest COVID-19 cases in region

Transmission electron microscopic image of an isolate from the first U.S. case of COVID-19, formerly known as 2019-nCoV. The spherical viral particles, colorized blue, contain cross-sections through the viral genome, seen as black dots. Image via US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

On Monday, Mar. 30, 2020, Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington (KFL&A) Public Health confirmed that the number of cases of COVID-19 in the region had doubled over the weekend.

On Friday, Mar. 27, 2020, the KFL&A region had 17 positive cases of COVID-19, according to Public Health. By Monday, Mar. 30, 2020, the number of positive cases had reached 34, highlighting the need for residents to adhere to Public Health’s message to maintain social-distancing and remain at home whenever possible to help reduce the spread of the virus in the area. Twelve of the 17 new cases were contracted via contact with a positive case and did not involve travel.

Today, Tuesday, Mar. 31, 2020, KFL&A Public Health released the details on the 17 cases that were reported the day prior. Those details are as follows:

  • Case 18 is that of a female in her 30s who had contact with a positive case and is now in self-isolation.
  • Case 19 is that of a female in her 50s who had recently travelled and is currently self-isolating.
  • Case 20 is that of a male in his 60s who had recently travelled and is currently self-isolating.
  • Case 21 is that of a female in her 20s who had contact with s with a positive case and is now in self-isolation.
  • Case 22 is that of a male in his 40s who had contact with with a positive case and is now in self-isolation.
  • Case 23 is that of a male in his 40s who had contact with with a positive case and is now in self-isolation.
  • Case 24 is that of a female under the age of 18 who had contact with a positive case and is now in self-isolation.
  • Case 25 is that of a male in his 50s who had contact with a positive case and is now in self-isolation.
  • Case 26 is that of a male in his 30s who had contact with a positive case and is now in self-isolation.
  • Case 27 is that of a male in his 20s who had contact with a positive case and is now in self-isolation.
  • Case 28 is that of a female in her 50s who had contact with a positive case and is now in self-isolation.
  • Case 29 is that of a male in his 50s who had contact with with a positive case and is now in self-isolation.
  • Case 30 is that of a female in her 50s who had recently travelled and is currently self-isolating.
  • Case 31 is that of a female in her 50s who had recently travelled and is currently self-isolating.
  • Case 32 is that of a male in his 20s who had contact with a positive case and is now in self-isolation.
  • Case 33 is that of a male in his 70s who recently travelled and came in contact with a positive case. He is currently self-isolating.
  • And case 34 is that of a male in his 50s who had contact with a positive case and is currently self-isolating.

At this time, none of the cases in the KFL&A region have fully recovered, however, when a case of recovery takes place, KFL&A Public Health said they would let the public know through their website.

As of noon on Tuesday, Mar. 31, 2020, KFL&A Public Health had no new cases to report. As always, Kingstonist has updated our COVID-19 Quick Reference Guide with the details of cases 18 through 34, as well as with some new information on cancellations, closures and changes the pandemic has caused in our community. If readers have additional information they feel should be included in this guide, please email us at [email protected].

472 Shares

One thought on “KFL&A Public Health releases details on 17 latest COVID-19 cases in region

  • April 2, 2020 at 8:18 am
    Permalink

    I have in the past attempted to have KFL&A Public Health get involved in the method of garbage collection points around housing areas in the city of Kingston. It was always their canned answer that it was not a matter of public health.

    Well, I did and even more so now with the current pandemic situation strongly disagree.

    Garbage is stockpiled at the collection points around housing areas at designated (not always) areas. The garbage is piled normally bagged and left. Loos garbage and old furniture plus any other odds and ends are also just tossed on the pile.

    From the day prior to city garbage collection (sometimes earlier) the piles of garbage start to accumulate. This results in children and scavenger hunters digging into the piles of garbage in search of items they consider attractive or of value (metal). In the process, bagged garbage ends up being ripped open and spread all over the neighbourhood by animals, wind, and gulls. Of this, spread garbage, we are unaware of what might likely contain virus spores and as we don’t know the life cycle of these spores, who they will, in turn, affect or infect.

    It is time that something is put in place to curtail these habits and the method of garbage collection in these areas, to include stiff fines for those caught scavenging in the garbage.

    One gentleman, when approached this more scavenging, informed me that he believed if one was to get the COVID-19 virus it would happen regardless. Also that what he was doing had no effect on me, WRONG, with all the media people still don’t get it. The same person 2 hours from now will be in line at the grocery store and handling products that he may or may not purchase, the next person to handle that product is screwed. Or maybe he will lend a friend his truck? Oh, and I haven’t even mentioned that scavenging garbage is not considered essential to be out driving around.

    Times have changed and it is time for the “norm” of how we handle things to change, asking people doesn’t help, enforcing does.

    Yes, I have in the past attempted to have KFL&A Public Health get involved in the method of garbage collection points around housing areas in the city of Kingston. It was always their canned answer that it was not a matter of public health.

    Well, I did and even more so now with the current pandemic situation strongly disagree.

    Garbage is stockpiled at the collection points around housing areas at designated (not always) areas. The garbage is piled normally bagged and left. Loos garbage and old furniture plus any other odds and ends are also just tossed on the pile.

    From the day prior to city garbage collection (sometimes earlier) the piles of garbage start to accumulate. This results in children and scavenger hunters digging into the piles of garbage in search of items they consider attractive or of value (metal). In the process, bagged garbage ends up being ripped open and spread all over the neighbourhood by animals, wind, and gulls. Of this, spread garbage, we are unaware of what might likely contain virus spores and as we don’t know the life cycle of these spores, who they will, in turn, affect or infect.

    It is time that something is put in place to curtail these habits and the method of garbage collection in these areas, to include stiff fines for those caught scavenging in the garbage.

    One gentleman, when approached this more scavenging, informed me that he believed if one was to get the COVID-19 virus it would happen regardless. Also that what he was doing had no effect on me, WRONG, with all the media people still don’t get it. The same person 2 hours from now will be in line at the grocery store and handling products that he may or may not purchase, the next person to handle that product is screwed. Or maybe he will lend a friend his truck? Oh, and I haven’t even mentioned that scavenging garbage is not considered essential to be out driving around.

    Yes, I have in the past attempted to have KFL&A Public Health get involved in the method of garbage collection points around housing areas in the city of Kingston. It was always their canned answer that it was not a matter of public health.

    Well, I did and even more so now with the current pandemic situation strongly disagree.

    Garbage is stockpiled at the collection points around housing areas at designated (not always) areas. The garbage is piled normally bagged and left. Loos garbage and old furniture plus any other odds and ends are also just tossed on the pile.

    From the day prior to city garbage collection (sometimes earlier) the piles of garbage start to accumulate. This results in children and scavenger hunters digging into the piles of garbage in search of items they consider attractive or of value (metal). In the process, bagged garbage ends up being ripped open and spread all over the neighbourhood by animals, wind, and gulls. Of this, spread garbage, we are unaware of what might likely contain virus spores and as we don’t know the life cycle of these spores, who they will, in turn, affect or infect.

    It is time that something is put in place to curtail these habits and the method of garbage collection in these areas, to include stiff fines for those caught scavenging in the garbage.

    YES, KFL&A Public Health, it is now a health hazard.

Leave a Reply